The Crew

These are the people that help make all of this possible; they may not be employees but they help to make sure that the content created by the museum and the content we recommend to you is accurate and well-sourced.

 
 

Clayton Jones

Known to many as a human encyclopedia, Clayton Jones is the creator, curator, camera man, photographer, editor, designer, narrator and researcher (among other things) for the Museum of the Cosmos and as such is self taught in a variety of skills that make this whole thing work. A great deal of the inspiration for the museum itself is Clayton’s curiosity, ability to understand and comprehend information and an inherited trait of being good at building and fabrication.

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Amie Robison

Amie Robison, also known as "The Pond Lady", is the aquatic ecologist for Robison Wildlife Solutions (RWS). RWS provides pond, lake, and land management services to private landowners in Oklahoma. RWS promotes native restoration and non-chemical solutions for restoring ponds, lakes, and watersheds, as well as the surrounding lands. A primary mission for RWS is to empower landowners with knowledge and encourage stewardship. Amie received her Bachelor's in Biology from Southeastern Oklahoma State University, and her Master's in Zoology from Oklahoma State University. She then went on to work as a fisheries technician for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation for six years, before resigning to become co-owner at RWS.


Gabriel Rucci

Gabriel Rucci is an entomologist-in-training currently studying pollination networks in the Cimarron Gypsum Hills of Oklahoma. He began his academic career focused on becoming a doctor. After earning his Associates he began working towards a BA at UCO in medical research. There he studied the affects of phenylalinine on embryonic heart development. During the final semester of his BA he took a field biology course and his future was finally clear. Now he works at the UCO museum excising and restoring invertebrate and herbarium specimens.

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